THE WORLD'S FIRST VOICE CLONING PROGRAM FOR PEOPLE WITH ALS
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CHALLENGE

Most people living with ALS (Motor Neurone Disease) end up paralysed and unable to communicate with anything but an artificial ‘computer’ voice, pre-recorded phrases or words mechanically stitched together. Ever since the Ice Bucket Challenge raised over $115 million dollars for the ALS Association, the ALS community has been eager to see breakthroughs that can improve their quality of life.

 
 

IDEA

We created Project Revoice, a program that 

gives people with ALS the full use of their own authentic voices, even after they can no longer physically speak. Powered by a custom machine learning algorithm that analyses and completely recreates a person’s voice, this gives patients the ability to communicate freely and naturally in their own voice, forever changing the way people live with ALS.

VIEW THE STORY

EXECUTION

To launch the program, we managed to recreate the voice of Pat Quinn, who co-founded the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge while fighting the disease himself. Since Pat hadn’t banked any audio, our challenge was to build a sufficient data bank ourselves from old Ice Bucket interviews and speeches found online. After sourcing over 100 individual files of varying quality, we manually analyzed, cleaned up and transcribed every usable section to create a unified data bank for the algorithm to work with. Once the voice had been cloned using a unique AI algorithm, we built a custom user interface for Pat to access the voice through his eye-tracking computer.

 
 

RESULTS

Since launch, Project Revoice has received significant interest from both the

ALS community and the general public:

 

THE FUTURE

To make this technology available to the wider ALS community, Project Revoice gives ALS sufferers the ability to easily record the voice material necessary for their own voice clones, free of charge. Users can today access and speak with their Revoices through a custom API, via their own Assisted/Augmentative Communication (AAC) devices. A custom web platform is currently in development.

 

While the technology is currently limited to English-speaking patients only, the ultimate goal of the program is to prevent anyone diagnosed with ALS from losing their voice.